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EATA Annual Meeting Compendium-2017








 

 

 

PRESENTATION DESCRIPTIONS

Workshop A
American Red Cross CPR PRO Instructor Course
This is an American Red Cross Instructor Certification that will enable the person to go to an institution or Business and offer the Certification at a discounted price. The participant will also be able to use the Certification to potentially earn additional income. This class will take 8-10 hours and is designed to educate the participant on the different Techniques and styles associated with teaching American Red Cross instructions.

Objectives:

  1. The attendee will identify the tools necessary to conduct a CPRPRO.
  2. The attendee will be able to apply the different lessons while evaluating their skills and techniques.
  3. The attendee will be able to explain all skills associated with CPR for the Professional Rescuer.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain: Treatment and Rehabilitation, Immediate and Emergency Care


Workshop B
Incorporating Neurodynamics Into Examination Of Treatment Of Athletes
Neurodynamics is becoming a staple of manual treatment. Understanding the physiology, mechanics, and application principles of the technique is essential. The purpose of this workshop is to educate the participant regarding the evaluation and treatment techniques at a variety of body regions. The lecture portion of this session will identify evidence supporting the use of neurodynamics. The lab will instruct proper technique to allow participants to develop a basic proficiency.

Objectives:

  1. Correctly summarize the anatomy and physiology of a healthy peripheral nerve and a mechanosentized peripheral nerve.
  2. Thoroughly assess athletes with impairments of their peripheral nervous system.
  3. Prescribe appropriate treatment techniques to athletes with neurodynamic impairments.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain: Treatment and Rehabilitation


Workshop C
EBP Workshop:  Evidence-Based Evaluation And Treatment Of The Sacroiliac Joint
Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is a common cause of low back pain in the physically active population. This session will present an evidence-based approach to evaluation and treatment of the sacroiliac joint, including the use of special tests, therapeutic exercise, manual therapy and muscle energy techniques. Attendees will learn and practice commonly utilized assessment techniques (1.5 hours) and therapeutic interventions (1.5 hours). Application of each assessment and treatment technique utilizing the best available evidence will be the focus of the session.

Objectives:

  1. Complete a comprehensive history and physical examination, according to the available evidence, in order to accurately diagnose sacroiliac joint pathology.
  2. Identify the most appropriate special tests, according to the available evidence, inorder to accurately diagnose sacroiliac joint pathology.
  3. Appropriately select, apply and interpret evidence-based evaluation procedures for the sacroiliac joint.
  4. Identify the most appropriate treatment interventions, according to the available evidence, in order to successfully treat patients with sacroiliac joint pathologies.
  5. Appropriately select, apply and interpret the outcomes of evidence-based treatment techniques for the sacroiliac joint.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain: Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis / Treatment and Rehabilitation


Workshop D
Can You Believe They Did That? Instituting Value Driven Leadership
A variety of leadership styles exist and are classified into two general categories; 1) relationship focus and 2) task focus. Current literature suggests that subordinates seek relational leadership, yet most leaders participate in a task oriented style. The disconnect is due to a lack of development prior to accepting a leadership role. The purpose of the workshop is to provide an introspective assessment of personal leadership style, values, and value assessment of others. Likewise, communication and motivational strategies of subordinates using assessed values will be accomplished through hands-on activities. The workshop is geared towards both new and mature leaders.

Objectives:

  1. Assess their own leadership style and values.
  2. Recognize the values of colleagues and subordinates.
  3. Utilize communication and motivation strategies based on individual value assessments to effect performance and task outcomes.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain: Organizational and Professional Health and Well-Being


Workshop E
Introduction To Musculoskeletal Ultrasound
Musculoskeletal Ultrasound is an increasingly utilized diagnostic modality in Sports medicine.  Athletic Trainers should be familiar with basic imaging findings and terminology associated with the use of Musculoskeletal Ultrasound.  The emphasis of this workshop will be live scanning.  This will provide an opportunity for Athletic Trainers to review the terms associated with common images.  We will work as a group to review what normal anatomy looks like with live scanning. Finally we will review pathology compared to normal anatomy.

Objectives:

  1. Recognize current uses of musculoskeletal ultrasound in sports medicine.
  2. Classify differences in bone, muscle, tendon, nerve, and arterial anatomy under ultrasound.
  3. Compare normal and abnormal anatomy under ultrasound.

Level of Difficulty: Mastery
Practice Domain: Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis


Workshop F
Why That Statistics Course You Took Didn’t Help You
Athletic training students are required to receive formal instruction in statistics and research design. This requirement is typically met through completion of an introductory statistics course founded in frequentist philosophy. This presentation will identify the limitations imposed by this perspective on clinicians seeking to translate the results of research into practice, introduce Bayesian reasoning as applied to forming a diagnosis, and reveal how Bayesian reasoning can be applied to the critical appraisal of research into the outcomes of treatment.

Objectives:

  1. Discuss the limitations in reporting p-values as an indicator of important findings. 
  2. Describe the iterative process of Bayesian reasoning. 
  3. Identify critical components in results reporting needed to translate results into clinical decision making. 
  4. Apply Bayesian reasoning in the critical appraisal of clinical research into the effectiveness of treatments and rehabilitation plans of care.

Level of Difficulty: Essential
Practice Domain: Organizational and Professional Health and Well-being


Workshop G
Closed Kinetic Chain Exercises And Myofascial Techniques For Upper And Lower Crossed Syndromes
The development of movement requires us to develop muscular differentiation to raise our spine against gravity and walk on our limbs.  Injuries, both neurologic and orthopedic, affect the neurological programming of this differentiation, creating either or both upper and lower crossed syndromes.  This programming requires certain rehabilitation exercises to combat these impairments.  Closed kinetic chain exercises and fascial release approaches for the hips and the shoulders are very effective in addressing these impairments.  This program in a workshop format will discuss muscular differentiation, the neurological impairment that influences the quality of this differentiation and how to improve it with specialized exercises and pin and stretch myofascial techniques.

Objectives:

  1. Define muscle differentiation from a developmental perspective, and why the crossed syndromes occur.
  2. Execute and demonstrate exercises and apply pin and stretch myofascial techniques to treat these neurologically programmed conditions.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain: Treatment and Rehabilitation


Workshop H
Management Of Ankle Sprains:  Novel Techniques For Athletic Trainers
Ankle sprains are the most common injury among the physically active but clinical management of this injury has remained somewhat stagnant.  This presentation will focus on evidence based interventions that fall outside of the traditional treatment paradigm of ankle sprain management. Content will be delivered in a format that allows clinicians to apply concepts and techniques immediately to their clinical practice.  This will include use of topical NSAID’s and ointments, joint mobilizations techniques, electrical modalities, balance training, orthoses and modification of traditional therapies as it relates to the uniqueness of athletic training.

Objectives:

  1. Analyze current literature that support or refute techniques used to manage ankle sprains.
  2. Analyze non-traditional techniques used to manage ankle sprains.
  3. Implement a treatment paradigm that integrates traditional and novel techniques to improve the management of ankle sprains.

Level of Difficulty: Essential
Practice Domain:
Immediate and Emergency Care, Treatment and Rehabilitation


Workshop I
A Comprehensive Approach To Evaluation And Treatment Of The Ill Athlete
As athletic trainers, we see it all.  Athletes who tell you they’re not feeling well - is it a cold? Flu? Pneumonia? Strep throat? Mumps? Should they practice? Rest? Be referred to another provider? Examining and treating patients who are sick is a necessary component of athletic training practice and recent evidence suggests ATs have less confidence in making decisions about patients who present with symptoms of illness versus those with orthopedic health conditions.  In this workshop you will develop your physical exam skills and refine your clinical decision making skills pertaining to management of the sick athlete.

Objectives:

  1. Demonstrate examination techniques for evaluating patients who are ill. 
  2. Determine a plan of care, including treatment, activity limitations and whether referral is necessary. 
  3. Apply clinical prediction rules to make care decisions.

Level of Difficulty: Essential
Practice Domain:
Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis, Immediate and Emergency Care, and Treatment and Rehabilitation


Workshop J
Treatment Interventions For Encouraging Lymphatic System Function
The lymphatic system is responsible for removal of waste product following injury and plays a vital role in the healing process.  The purpose of this workshop is to review the anatomy and physiology of the lymphatic system and to discuss therapeutic interventions that are aimed at enhancing lymphatic drainage following injury.  The lecture portion of the workshop will include current research associated with treating edema associated with orthopedic injury.  The hands-on portion of the workshop will focus on utilization of traditional electrical and manual modes of treatment in addition to emerging modalities and treatment approaches.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to identify the main physiological features of the lymphatic system. 
  2. Participants will be able to summarize key journal articles associated with the treatment of edema and understand their application to clinical practice. 
  3. Participants will be able to develop treatments for various injuries that serve to maximize the utilization of the lymphatic system and support the healing process. 

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain:
Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis and Treatment and Rehabilitation


Workshop K
Movement Dysfunction In Athletes
Injuries to the shoulder and elbow are very common in baseball and overhead sports.  These injuries often occur due to a breakdown in the kinetic chain.  Movement dysfunction involves assessing an individual’s movement and detecting faulty neuromuscular patterns that often lead to injuries far from the injured body part.  The workshop will include strategies to assess and correct movement dysfunction for prevention and rehabilitation of injuries in physically active individuals.  These strategies include techniques from: Postural Restoration Institute (PRI), Vladimir Janda, NASM, and FMS, such as squat assessment, breathing dysfunction, asymmetrical inhibition/ activation, posture assessment, and faulty muscle timing.

Objectives:

  1. Recognize athletes that present with movement dysfunction or poor movement patterns. 
  2. Assess poor movement patterns and apply corrective exercises to correct those patterns. 
  3. Describe how poor movement patterns at the lower extremity affect the shoulder and elbow in throwing for overhead athlete.   
  4. Explain how poor breathing patterns affect overhead throwing mechanics. 
  5. Assess poor breathing patterns and describe how to correct those patterns.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain:
Injury/Illness Prevention and Wellness Protection, Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis, and Treatment and Rehabilitation


Workshop L
Concussions And CTE: Legal Implications To The Athletic Trainer
As reported concussions continue to increase at all levels, plaintiffs are bringing more and more lawsuits against athletic trainers to meet the appropriate standard of care. The popularity of these actions is attributable not only to the increasing knowledge surrounding the dangers of concussions, but also because plaintiffs’ attorneys are now specifically targeting these so-called “concussion” and “CTE” cases. 

In what is becoming a terrifying trend for ATs and others, today’s reality is that following a catastrophic head injury in the sports’ context, the first question becomes who – other than the injured athlete – is responsible for that catastrophic outcome. That question quickly then becomes who must ultimately pay the injured athlete (or the surviving family in a death case) to compensate for that injury. The key, of course, is to have properly addressed these issues before a lawsuit is filed.

Objectives:

  1. Provide lessons learned in the courtroom defending ATs in concussion cases.
  2. Suggest ways in which future litigation risk may be minimized.
  3. Provide an update on recent guideline changes and additions that affect ATs in a space where the standard of care continues to evolve.

Level of Difficulty: Essential
Practice Domain:
Organizational and Professional Health and Well-being


Workshop M
To Supplement Is Human To Eat Naturally Is Divine
Many athletes are self-prescribing herbals and dietary supplements to address their health or fitness concerns. However, many supplements may not work or they can cause havoc with a medical condition or dietary status. Quite often athletic trainers are overwhelmed with the plethora of information regarding herbals and dietary supplements due to their busy schedules thus guiding an athlete’s decision to use herbals or dietary supplements is challenging.  This session will provide participants the basic “tools” to critically analyze herbal and dietary supplements. In addition, the “foods first philosophy” will be reviewed and suggested strategies will be presented.

Objectives:

  1. Implement the basic “tools” to critically analyze the many aspects of dietary supplements. These “tools” will help guide the athlete’s decision whether to use herbals or dietary supplements. 
  2. Recognize reliable resources when evaluating the safety, purity and efficacy of dietary supplements. 
  3. Comprehend the federal and sport governing body rules and regulations regarding dietary supplements and banned substances. 
  4. Devise strategies to promote the “Food First” philosophy.

Level of Difficulty: Essential
Practice Domain:
Organizational and Professional Health and Well-being


Lecture #1
EBP Session:  The Fascial Evidence In The Treatment Of Soft Tissue Injuries
Recent advances in understanding the anatomy and function of fascial tissue have led to improved outcomes with therapeutic interventions directed at the treatment of dysfunction.  The fascial system is a three dimensional, interconnected network which allows the body an ability to sense, adapt, transmit, and dissipate forces throughout. The presentation of the best available evidence regarding concepts of biotensegrity and mechanotransduction, coupled with the anatomical and neurological understanding of fascial tissue will lead the clinician to a better appreciation of musculoskeletal function, the continuity of all body tissues, and the appropriate treatment options for fascial dysfunctions.

Objectives:

  1. Distinguish the anatomy, innervations, and role fascial tissue plays in the function of the MSK system and proprioception  
  2. Interpret and integrate the role and efficacy of appropriate therapeutic interventional treatments for identified fascial dysfunctions 
  3. Define the underlying foundational theories and concepts of fascial tissue, i.e.: biotensegrity and mechanotransduction
Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain:
Clinical Evaluation & Diagnosis and Treatment & Rehabilitationjj
Lecture #2
The Role Of Subconcussion Research In Advancing Clinical Decision-Making
Many sports involve repetitive subconcussive head impacts, and the immediate and long-term effects remain largely unknown. Studying subconcussive head impacts can help develop and validate diagnostic assessments, and may hold the potential to help identify individuals at risk for long-term neurological dysfunction. Our lecture will describe a subconcussive testing paradigm and how results were utilized to help modify clinical care.  We will also provide the effect of subconcussive head impacts on blood biomarkers and how this may help provide information about acute and long-term brain health.

Objectives:

  1. Discuss subconcussion literature and testing models. 
  2. Describe how subconcussion research can be used to modify their clinical practice.   
  3. Describe blood biomarkers and interpret current usefulness in clinical decision making. 

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain:
Injury/Illness Prevention and Wellness Protection


Lecture #3
Outcome Measures Made Easy: The Top Ten You Can Use Now
The use of patient- and clinician-rated outcome measures is an essential component of effective patient-centered care. With hundreds of outcome measures available, a significant barrier to their routine use is simply knowing which ones to use.  In this presentation, we will identify 10 outcome measures that have demonstrated relevance in an athletic population. Foundational concepts for the use and interpretation of these select outcome measures will be presented using a case-based approach.

Objectives:

  1. Describe how outcome measures positively impact the delivery of patient-centered care. 
  2. Integrate the use of outcome measures into their practice. 
  3. Interpret the findings of select outcome measures when used with a specific patient. 

Level of Difficulty: Essential
Practice Domain:
Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis and Treatment and Rehabilitation


Lecture #4
The Secondary School Value Model
This presentation will highlight the Secondary School Value Model. This presentation is designed to introduce the Secondary School Value Model to ATs in this setting, and provide tools/suggestions in regard to its implementation. Secondary School ATs need to be able to understand and demonstrate their value to their parents, administrators, and community in order to improve their job satisfaction, improve patient care, and increase economic impact for their school and program. Traditionally, SSATC's have not had the comfort level, or skill set to understand and apply business concepts to their setting, which will also be presented. The NATA has developed various tools to assist with this process, but nothing as comprehensive and easy to use as the Secondary School Value Model.

Objectives:

  1. Attendees will be able identify business concepts as they relate to their practice. 
  2. Attendees will be able to explain the components of the SSVM. 
  3. Attendees will be able to integrate the tools of the SSVM, PIG, PPG into their practice. 
  4. Attendees will be able to develop a plan for applying the SSVM to their practice. 
  5. Attendees will be able to define ROI, and explain how they can demonstrate ROI in their practice. 

Level of Difficulty: Mastery
Practice Domain:
Organizational and Professional Health and Well-Being


Lecture #5
Evidence Based Management Of Achilles Injuries
Achilles injury is fairly common in sports. Treatment for Achilles rupture often focuses on surgical repair, however, recent literature highlights the success of non-operative care. This presentation will review current literature, compare surgical and conservative management strategies and offer best practice suggestions based on the literature for management of Achilles injury.   

Objectives:

  1. Discuss and compare the non-operative and surgical treatments of Achilles injury.
  2. Discuss the rehabilitation treatments of Achilles injury.

Level of Difficulty: Mastery
Practice Domain:
Injury/Illness Prevention and Wellness Protection, Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis, Immediate and Emergency Care, and Treatment and Rehabilitation


Lecture #6
What Is The Future Of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
ACL injury in sports is a very common sports injury which frequently results in surgery and prolonged disability.  Research is currently being conducted to improve outcomes and options for patients who must undergo ACL reconstruction.   Use of biologics, stem cells, scaffolds and tissue engineering offer potential alternatives once they have been fully tested and refined. To date, these options are not yet available for human ACL reconstruction, but their evolution is quickly developing.  This one hour presentation will discuss the future for ACL reconstructions.

Objectives:

  1. The learner should be able to summarize future options for athletes who undergo ACL reconstructive surgery.
  2. The learner should be able to utilize the information presented and adapt their future management strategies for ACL injured athletes.
  3. The learner should be able to appropriately prepare athletes who are undergoing ACL surgery that may be considering surgery augmented by a biologic or engineered tissue.

Level of Difficulty: Mastery
Practice Domain:
Injury/Illness Prevention and Wellness Protection, Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis, Immediate and Emergency Care, and Treatment and Rehabilitation


Lecture #7
EBP Lecture:  The Evaluation Of Response Shift And Functional Outcomes Following A 4-Week Comprehensive, Evidence-Based Rehabilitation Program In Individuals With Chronic Ankle Instability
The purpose of this presentation is to explore the effects of a multifaceted chronic ankle instability rehabilitation program on disease-oriented and patient-oriented outcomes. This rehabilitation program combines multiple evidence-based interventions that have been previously established in the literature. Furthermore, its effectiveness will be detailed in terms of common disease-oriented measures as well as a multidimensional profile of health-related quality of life. Additionally, theoretical background of response shift theory will be discussed as to provide context to its application to chronic ankle instability rehabilitation. The exploration of response shift will help improve the interpretation self-reported function changes following rehabilitation.  

Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to understand and implement the interventions explained in the presentation.
  2. The current evidence to support the implementation of CAI interventions will be discussed and participants will be able to determine their clinical usefulness. 
  3. Participants will gain knowledge concerning response shift and its potential to confound self-reported measures.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain:
Organizational and Professional Health and Well-being


Lecture #8
The Good, The Bad And The Ugly: Protein & Athletes
Protein is a hot a topic – both within the athletic world and among general consumers.  But, there is confusion about what type, how much, when and the benefits.  This session will review the latest research – and what’s coming down the pipeline – and recommendations that offer practical advice for your athletes, including the benefits of protein prior to sleep and how to successfully space protein consumption throughout the day.

Objectives:

  1. Be able to better describe the current recommendations for protein consumption by athletes. 
  2. Be able to apply practical advice for their athletes on how to best incorporate protein into training regimens to maximize recovery and performance. 
  3. Be able to summarize the latest research related to protein consumption and athletes. 

Level of Difficulty: Essential
Practice Domain: Injury/Illness Prevention and Wellness Protection


Lecture #9
Hyperthermia: What’s The Link And How Might Exercise Associated Hyponatremia Play A Role?The presentation will focus on how the systemic inflammatory response (via cytokines) is central to EHS, rhabdomyolysis and malignant hyperthermia.  Mutation of the RyR1 gene is linked to EHS and malignant hyperthermia in humans and other mammals, and there appears to be genetic predisposition, particularly in males.  Case studies will be presented in humans and the equine species who have been afflicted with two or more of these maladies.  Additionally, recent research will be presented on Exercise Associated Hyponatremia (EAH) and how it, too, may be linked to rhabdomyolysis such that overdrinking may in fact not help but rather be seen as a causative factor in rhabdomyolysis.

Objectives:

  1. Recognize similarities and distinguish the differences between EHS, Rhabdomyolysis and Malignant Hyperthermia. 
  2. Compare the signs and symptoms common to each of these illnesses (EHS, Rhabdomyolysis and Malignant Hyperthermia). 
  3. Recognize exercise associated hyponatremia (EAH) and describe how dilutional EAH could contribute to rhabdomyolysis. 
  4. Summarize the common underlying factors that link these pathologies. 

Level of Difficulty: Mastery
Practice Domain:
Injury/Illness Prevention and Wellness Protection, Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis, and Immediate and Emergency Care 


Lecture #10
Athletic Training Using A Medical Model
This topic addresses how the organizational model for AT can have a direct impact not only on patient care but the athletic trainer’s professional health and well-being.  Presentation will introduce concepts about how the medical model can improve patient care, compensation, life balance and retention of young professionals.  The presentation will cover essential level material related to both internal and external business functions of athletic training using a medical model.  Examples of how this structure can be developed in multiple employment areas will be provided.  This topic aligns with the domain, “Organizational and Professional Health and Well-being.” 

Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to identify at least 3 main differences between the Medical Model and Traditional Model of Athletic Training. 
  2. Participants will be able to identify at least 3 different options to incorporate or start a Medical Model in the multiple different settings of athletic training. 
  3. Participants will be able to identify and discuss at least 3 different ways that the Medical Model will be able to improve patient care. 
  4. Participants will be able to identify and discuss at least 3 different benefits of the Medical Model for the athletic trainers’ professional health and well-being.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain:
Organizational and Professional Health and Well-being


Lecture #11
EBP Session: The Role Of Knee Laxity In ACL Injury Risk: Implications For Clinical PracticeGreater knee laxity has consistently been associated with a greater risk of ACL injury.  This session will examine what is known about the biologic (intrinsic ligament properties) and biomechanical consequences (high risk movement patterns) of a lax knee, the role that genetics and hormones play in these biological and biomechanical processes, and the clinical implications of these findings for injury risk screening and prevention strategies.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the biological processes through which knee laxity may contribute to ACL injury risk
  2. Describe the biomechanical process through which knee laxity may contribute to ACL injury risk
  3. Understand the underlying hormonal and genetic factors that can promote greater knee laxity in females
  4. Apply the knowledge from 1-3 to develop more targeted screening and prevention strategies for those with greater knee laxity

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain:
Injury/Illness Prevention and Wellness Protection


Lecture #12
The Exposure Of Athletic Trainers To Critical Incidents And Traumatic Events And The Need For Peer-To-Peer Support In The Aftermath
Athletic Trainers deal with critical incidents such as the death of an athlete or colleague, a catastrophic injury, or a significant personal or work related event affecting those around him/her.  The focus is to present the need for peer-to-peer support for the AT after a traumatic event.  I will present questionnaire data from Athletic Trainers about their exposure to traumatic events, the support methods they felt were most helpful after an event, and the need for a peer-to-peer program.  Information regarding existing peer support programs, ATs Care and how a CISM team works will be included in the talk.

Objectives:

  1. The participant will describe the effects of traumatic events and critical incidents on athletic trainers and other caregivers. 
  2. The participant will recognize the signs and behavioral changes that may take place after being exposed to a traumatic event and the need for intervention. 
  3. The participant will be able to summarize the role of a peer-to-peer support intervention and how to activate a peer-to-peer/CISM team if needed.

Level of Difficulty: Essential
Practice Domain:
Organizational and Professional Health and Well-being


Lecture #13
Ethical Considerations For The Athletic Training Professional
Applying professional ethics in athletic training starts with knowing the NATA Code of Ethics. There is a general lack of knowledge in the principles of the NATA Code of Ethics. The NATA Committee of Professional Ethics (COPE) primary goal is to better prepare the certified athletic trainer to perform ethically by understanding the NATA Code of Ethics. This presentation will summarize the NATA Code of Ethics and the ethical violations process for the participants. This presentation will provide various ethical scenarios for interpretation for the participants to consider. This presentation will assist the certified athletic trainer in integrating the NATA Code of Ethics in their professional practice.

Objectives:

  1. Summarize the importance of ethical professional practice. 
  2. List the principles of the NATA Code of Ethics and ethical violations process. 
  3. Review potential scenarios that challenge professional ethics. 

Level of Difficulty: Essential
Practice Domain:
Organizational and Professional Health and Well-Being


Lecture #14
Throwing Injuries From The Ground Up
This presentation will discuss the biomechanics and kinetic chain of the throwing process with emphasis on function of the core and scapulothoracic mechanism for creating power. Also an analysis and breakdown that leads to injury will be discussed and where it is located within the kinetic chain.

Objectives:

  1. Identify common and complex injuries that occurs throughout the throwing phase.
  2. Determine where and why the injury occurred within a specific phase of throwing.
  3. Perform clinical evaluation of throwing injuries to properly diagnose, treat and return to play.

Level of Difficulty: Essential
Practice Domain:
Injury/Illness Prevention and Wellness Protection, Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis, and Treatment and Rehabilitation


Lecture #15
EBP Lecture: The Art And Science Of Sports Medicine Part 1: The Epistemology Of Clinical Practice
The session will begin with a brief overview of what science is, their origin, and how we incorporate its systematic process to explain and predict clinical phenomena. The main objective of this presentation is to explain how we have come to rely on science in our clinical practice and the potential misconceptions that cloud our ability to call upon science appropriately in making clinical decisions.

Objectives:

  1. Discuss the origins of science as a systematic process that is rooted in probability rather than proof. 
  2. Describe the clinical scientific method and its value in understanding how clinicians move from explanation to prediction. 
  3. Recognize some common misconceptions about what science is and what it isn’t with regard to determining the effectiveness of clinical practices.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain:
Injury/Illness Prevention and Wellness Protection, Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis, and Treatment and Rehabilitation


Lecture #16
EBP Lecture: The Art And Science Of Sports Medicine Part 2: The Placebo Effect
The Placebo Effect goes beyond the sugar pill. It is a real effect, centered on an applied (research evidence - supported or - unsupported) intervention, and should not be disregarded. In the broader context of a biopsychosocial approach to medicine, the placebo effect does “treat”, i.e., symptom relief does indicate improvement in health. The purpose of this presentation is to present concepts related to the Placebo Effect, including its common mischaracterizations and genuine manifestations, and how clinicians can utilize this effect to improve clinical decision-making without endorsing shoddy science or “snake oil” remedies. 

Objectives:

  1. Reconcile the seemingly disparate concepts of “placebo effect” and “healing”. 
  2. Discuss the characteristics of the placebo effect that can be distinguished from specific biologically-grounded treatment effects. 
  3. Justify how clinicians can maximize ancillary gains from the placebo effect when treating patients with a biologically-grounded intervention.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain: Injury/Illness Prevention and Wellness Protection, Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis, and Treatment and Rehabilitation


Lecture # 17
EBP Lecture: The Art And Science Of Sports Medicine Part 3: The Role Of Complimentary Therapies In Sports Medicine Practice
The previous discussions on science and placebo effect allow for a new look at complementary and alternative medicine. Many of these modalities are deep rooted and have been in use for hundreds of years. However, most clinicians are unsure of their scientific merit. This presentation will introduce the clinician to a variety of institutions and center dedicated to the science of CAM. It will orient the practitioner to the credible resources that provide inquiry and review of these practices. And, it will provide discussion of selective practices that may have an immediate role in clinical practice.

Objectives:

  1. Identify centers for research actively involved in complementary and alternative medicines.
  2. Learn where to access peer reviewed resources for current research on complementary and alternative medicines.
  3. Discuss the researched viability of several complementary and alternative therapies and their potential role in sports medicine care.

Level of Difficulty: Advanced
Practice Domain:
Injury/Illness Prevention and Wellness Protection, Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis, and Treatment and Rehabilitation

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